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Ramblin Man

The Allman Brothers Band was grieving in the fall of 1972. Their prior two albums—”At Fillmore East” and “Eat a Peach”—had pioneered a new sound by blending roadhouse blues and long, improvised rock guitar solos. But the motorcycle death a year earlier of Duane Allman—the band’s co-founder and co-lead guitarist—was a blow that left the band’s future uncertain.

In need of material for their next album, “Brothers and Sisters,” guitarist Dickey Betts offered up “Ramblin’ Man,” a song he had written and hoped to sell in Nashville. The band liked the upbeat country song about wanderlust, but all agreed it would need an arrangement more in keeping with their blues-rock sound.

You can find the full story at WSJ.com

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